curriculum theory

curriculum theoryOrder DescriptionFor this proposal, you should detail the form of your final project, the question(s) you might be posing, why you find your area of inquiry significant, and provide an initial bibliography (APA-style referencing). Also, you should outline which of the course readings you plan to include in your discussion.Though your final paper can deal with any subject at all (related to curriculum theory), it’s important that you do include some of the assigned readings in your discussion.3.Final PaperProposalWhile your final project can take the form of an academic paper (2500-3000 words), it can also be done otherwise. For this proposal, you should detail the form of your final project, the question(s) you might be posing, why you find your area of inquiry significant, and provide an initial bibliography (APA-style referencing). Also, you should outline which of the course readings you plan to include in your discussion (and obviously, this can change as the course progresses).Reading Schedule1) IntroductionJanuary 4-10:Egan, K. (2003). What is curriculum? Journal of the Canadian Association for Curriculum Studies, 1(1), 9-16.Pinar, W. (2005). The problem with curriculum and pedagogy.Journal of Curriculum and Pedagogy, 2(1), 67-82.Snaza, N. (2010).Thirteen theses on the question of state in curriculum studies. In E. Malewski (Ed.), Curriculum studies handbook: The next moment (pp. 43-56). New York: Routledge.2) A Canadian Curriculum Studies?January 11-17:Ng-A-Fook. (2014). Provoking the very “idea” of Canadian curriculum studies as a counterpointed composition. Journal of the Canadian Association for Curriculum Studies, 12(1), 10-68.Johnston, I. (2014). Not “as Canadian as possible under the circumstances”: The struggle to be visible in Canadian curriculum studies. Journal of the Canadian Association for Curriculum Studies, 12(1), 69-75.Chambers, C. (2012). “We are all treaty people”: The countenance of Canadian curriculum studies. In N. Ng-A-Fook & J. Rottman (Eds.), Reconsidering Canadian curriculum studies: Provoking historical, present, and future perspectives (pp. 23-38). New York: Palgrave Macmillan.3) AutobiographyJanuary 18-24:Leggo, C. (2010). Writing a life: Representation in language and image. Transnational Curriculum Inquiry, 7(2), 47-61.Strong-Wilson, T. (2015). Phantom traces: Exploring a hermeneutical approach to autobiography in curriculum studies. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 47(5), 613-632.4) Indigenous PerspectivesJanuary 25-31:Chambers, C. (2010). “I was grown up before I was born”: Wisdom in Kangiryarmuit life stories. Transnational Curriculum Inquiry, 7(2), 5-38.Donald, D. (2004). Edmonton pentimento: Re-reading history in the case of the Papaschase Cree. Journal of the Canadian Association for Curriculum Studies, 2(1), 21-54.Weenie, A. (2008).Curricular theorizing from the periphery.Curriculum Inquiry, 38(5), 545-557.5) PhenomenologyFebruary 1-7:Magrini, J. M. (2015). Phenomenology and curriculum implementation: Discerning a living curriculum through the analysis of Ted Aoki’s situational praxis. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 47(2), 274-299.van Manen, M. (1982). Phenomenological pedagogy. Curriculum Inquiry, 12(3), 283-299.Hunsberger, M. (1992). The time of texts. In W. Pinar & W. Reynolds (Eds.), Understanding curriculum as phenomenological and deconstructed text (64-91). New York: Teachers College Press.6) Queer TheoryFebruary 8-14:Sumara, D. & Davis, B. (1999). Interrupting heteronomativity: Toward a queer curriculum theory. Curriculum Theory, 29(2), 191-208.Ahmed, S. (2006). Orientations: Toward a queer phenomenology.GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies, 12(4), 543-574.February 15-21: READING WEEK7) Psychoanalysis and SexualityFebruary 22-28:Britzman, D.P. (1999). On becoming a “little sex researcher”: Some comments on a polymorphously perverse curriculum. In W.F. Pinar (Ed.), Contemporary curriculum discourses: Twenty years of JCT (pp. 379-397). New York: Peter Lang.Taubman, P.M. (2006). I love them to death. In G.M. Boldt & P.M. Salvio (Eds.), Love’s return: Psychoanalytic essays on childhood, teaching and learning (pp. 19-32). New York: Routledge.Casemore, B. (2010). Free association in sex education: Understanding sexuality as the flow of thought in conversation and curriculum. Sex Education, 10(3), 309-324.8) Critical Pedagogy, Social Justice and SolidarityFebruary 29-March 6:Apple, M. (1999). Remembering capital: On the connections between French fries and education. In W.F. Pinar (Ed.), Contemporary curriculum discourses: Twenty years of JCT (pp. 312-324). New York: Peter Lang.Conrad, D. (2006). Justice for youth versus a curriculum of conformity in schools and prisons.Journal of the Canadian Association for Curriculum Studies, 4(2), 1-20.Gaztambide-Fernández, R. (2010). In E. Malewski (Ed.), Curriculum studies handbook: The next moment (pp. 78-94). New York: Routledge.9) Culture, Race, and EthnicityMarch 7- 13:Aoki, T. T. (1983). Experiencing ethnicity as a Japanese Canadian teacher: Reflections on a personal curriculum. Curriculum Inquiry, 13(3), 321-335.Elbaz-Luwisch, F. (2004). How is education possible when there’s a body in the middle of the room? Curriculum Inquiry, 34(1), 9-27.Gaztambide-Fernández, R. & Murad, Z. (2011). Out of line: Perspectives on the “browning” of curriculum and pedagogy. Journal of Curriculum and Pedagogy, 8(1), 14-16.Maudlin, J. G. (2014). The abandonment of hope: Curriculum theory and white moral responsibility. Journal of Curriculum and Pedagogy, 11(2), 136-153.10) Arts-Based InquiryMarch 14-20:Carter, M. (2014). Complicating the curricular conversation with Antonin Artaud and Maxine Greene. Journal of the Canadian Association for Curriculum Studies, 11(2), 21-43.Greene, M. (1987). Creating, experiencing, sense-making: Art worlds in school. The Journal of Aesthetic Education, 21(4), 11-23.Snowber, C. (2013). Dancing a curriculum of hope: Cultivating passion as an embodied inquiry. Journal of Curriculum Theorizing, 28(2), 199-125.11) Aesthetics and ReadingMarch 21-27:Irwin, R. (2003). Toward an aesthetic of unfolding in/sights through curriculum.Journal of the Canadian Association for Curriculum Studies, 1(2), 63-78.Brushwood Rose, C. (2006). Virtual curriculum: Digital games as technologies of aesthetic experience and potential spaces. Journal of the Canadian Association for Curriculum Studies, 4(1), 97-110.Sumara, D. (1999). Of seagulls and glass roses: Teachers’ relationships with literary texts as transformational space. In W.F. Pinar (Ed.), Contemporary curriculum discourses: Twenty years of JCT (pp. 289-305). New York: Peter Lang.12) A Curriculum of the Unthinkable MindMarch 28-April 3:Barry, L. (2014). Syllabus: Notes from an accidental professor. Drawn & Quarterly: Montreal.13) Curriculum of Place and EcologyApril 4-8:Jardine, D. (1999). A bell ringing in the empty sky.In W.F. Pinar (Ed.), Contemporary curriculum discourses: Twenty years of JCT (pp. 262-277). New York: Peter Lang.Maudlin, J. (2013). Southern discomfort: Unsettling “home” through autobiography. In W. M. Reynolds (Ed.), A curriculum of place: Understandings emerging through the Southern mist (pp. 185-201). New York: Peter Lang.Chambers, C. (2008). Where are we? Finding common ground in a curriculum of place. Journal of the Canadian Association for Curriculum Studies, 6(2), 113-128.

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